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building new boat

Postby Tim Heaney on Fri Oct 14, 2005 8:42 pm

I am looking at building a new boat and would like information on the templates used and how they compair with the new Botterill boats (are the Botterill boats taken from sail no 855 ). I am also keen to hear of any tweeks or tucks that work. See you on the water some day

Tim Heaney.
Tim Heaney
 

Botterill Boats

Postby Phillip Johnson on Fri Oct 14, 2005 9:01 pm

The current mould used by Botterill is owned by the Victorian Sabre Sailing Association. This mould was taken from a boat built by John Hawkins.
Phillip Johnson
 

Ply weight

Postby tim heaney on Sat Oct 22, 2005 4:17 pm

Does anyone know what the combined weight of the five sheets of ply needs to weigh in at and what is added after hull construction.

Thank you for the reply on the glass boats, I was just curious knowing a littel about the boat 855 and having ownnd 854 in the mid 80s.

Great web site obviesly a lot of hard work and a lot of time spent to make it interesting and informative A job well done
tim heaney
 

Weight Of Plywood

Postby Phillip Johnson on Sun Oct 23, 2005 10:46 am

The total weight of uncut plywood ie 5 sheets is about 56 to60 lbs. This is based on 3 sheets of 4mm and 2 sheets of 5mm. The plywood is gaboon.
At the present time it is very difficult if not impossible to get 5mm. It is permitted to use 4mm for the bootom panels and bring the thickness to 4.5mm using fibreglass on one or both sides. This does not increase the weight very much and the finished boat should be very close to the minimum weight. Care needs to taken to remove excess resin when doing the fibreglass sheathing.

Phillip Johnson
National Measurer
Phillip Johnson
 

ply weight

Postby tim heaney on Mon Oct 24, 2005 9:22 pm

thank you for the ply weight answer hope to see you soon on the water.
tim heaney
 

Re: Weight Of Plywood

Postby Guest on Mon Nov 14, 2005 5:57 pm

Phillip Johnson wrote:The total weight of uncut plywood ie 5 sheets is about 56 to60 lbs. This is based on 3 sheets of 4mm and 2 sheets of 5mm. The plywood is gaboon.
At the present time it is very difficult if not impossible to get 5mm. It is permitted to use 4mm for the bootom panels and bring the thickness to 4.5mm using fibreglass on one or both sides. This does not increase the weight very much and the finished boat should be very close to the minimum weight. Care needs to taken to remove excess resin when doing the fibreglass sheathing.

Phillip Johnson
National Measurer
Guest
 

Re: Weight Of Plywood

Postby tim heaney on Mon Nov 14, 2005 5:58 pm

Phillip Johnson wrote:The total weight of uncut plywood ie 5 sheets is about 56 to60 lbs. This is based on 3 sheets of 4mm and 2 sheets of 5mm. The plywood is gaboon.
At the present time it is very difficult if not impossible to get 5mm. It is permitted to use 4mm for the bootom panels and bring the thickness to 4.5mm using fibreglass on one or both sides. This does not increase the weight very much and the finished boat should be very close to the minimum weight. Care needs to taken to remove excess resin when doing the fibreglass sheathing.

Phillip Johnson
National Measurer
tim heaney
 

lowering the chine

Postby tim heaney on Sun Nov 27, 2005 7:35 pm

I belive some builders have played with lowering the aft section of the chine. Having a play i belive it is posible fairing from the max chine mesurements to the transom to add 35 to 40 mm to the transom. this is quiet a change from the boats at my club which follow close to the templates. the idear is to flaten the aft from the center plate back. is this somthing that has been done and if so was this a succes or a move in the wrong direction or am i taking it too far maybe 20 to 25 mm is more what i should be looking at. allso keen to hear of any other hints that may be about.



thanke tim
tim heaney
 

Postby peter reid on Wed Dec 14, 2005 4:26 pm

hi tim heany i remember you as an ace sabre sailor from gippsland during the eighties sailing 854 sorry fogot the boats name- great that your thinkin of making a comeback though it goes without saying that very few melbourne sabre sailors from your era are still active in the class hey but i am as are those absolute legends from black rock who will probably take their sabres to heaven hey- i sailed a plastic sabre 1209 called wombat at daveys bay unfortunately sabres are now extinct there
peter reid
 
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Location: melbourne

Postby ronny_f73 on Tue Jun 13, 2006 6:12 pm

tim
the boat looks great on the web site...did you play with lowering the aft section of the chine?/.. if so what did yopu end up using??
Think its a great idea re the kits...
ron
1620
Later On
ronny_f73
 
Posts: 41
Joined: Tue Aug 23, 2005 12:46 pm
Location: Blackwood SA

Postby A Trace of Blue - 1666 on Tue Jun 20, 2006 12:53 am

Hi all,

Back from sea and just starting a second Sabre in WA. With the two others planned, and the plans and timber have been purcased, that will give us 5 WA Sabres.

On the timber weight issue, I have weighed every sheet of 4mm I am using in the boat I have just started, and all were approximately 5kg, ranging from about 4.9kg to 5.15kg. This boat will be all 4mm with the floors glassed.

I have heard from a Chandlery here that they have had loads of 4mm ply come in unsighted from the supplier in varying quality of finish, and as much as 750g (3/4 Kg) difference between lighest and heaviest sheets. It is well worth your while if intending to build a timber boat to go and personally sight each sheet you intend to purchase. Take a set of analog bathroom scales and weigh them all as well. Note: Analog scales give better accuracy, as most digital bathroom scales (such as my current ones) only display every .5 KG, ie 2kg, then 2.5kg, then 3kg. Does not tell me if one sheet is 4.85kg and a second sheet is 5.20kg, but displays 5kg for both.

On the question Tim Heaney asked, it is up to the builder what they do with their Transom and chines. At the end of the day, as long as the boat fits into the specifications for the Rocker measurements, and other associated measurements for the Transom, chine-chine etc, it should be a legal sabre. The tollerences are all in the rules.
Peter Wilcox
1666 - A Trace of Blue

God Still Sails a Payne-Mortlock Sailing Canoe!
A Trace of Blue - 1666
 
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Location: Bittern - Victoria


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