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A modern rigging guide

Postby CDance on Sun Aug 02, 2009 9:20 pm

Hi All,

As many will know, we have some new Sabre fleets starting up around the country (e.g. WA), and a number of seasoned sailors are building new boats over the winter. A few people have asked me to email through some photos of my boat, and/or offer advise regarding fittings, etc. I've decided it might be better to put together a short rigging guide a make it available to all.

You can read a first cut here:

http://docs.google.com/View?id=dcz4c74g_117dqz8b2gj

If I've missing any photos or explanations, or if you have your own advise you'd like to include, please let me know (or post below in the forum).

Cheers,

Chris
Sabre 1778 Espresso
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Re: A modern rigging guide

Postby jgb75 on Tue Aug 04, 2009 10:34 am

Thanks for posting that Chris, it's very useful information.

I was interested to see that your shrouds attach to saddles on the gunwale instead of chainplates. Does your boat have some additional reinforcement in that area to spread the load from the shrouds?

I wonder if the same approach would work on a ply sabre as I've no idea how I'm going to bend my chainplates (2mm thick stainless steel) to match the angle of the shrouds.

Thanks,

Jamie
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Postby GuestMember on Tue Aug 04, 2009 1:46 pm

Jamie

Just put the them in a vice and bend them that way before you attach them, 2mm is no match for a hammer. You can bend them with a pliers once there in also but dosen't work as well
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Re: A modern rigging guide

Postby jgb75 on Tue Aug 04, 2009 3:00 pm

GuestMember wrote:Jamie

Just put the them in a vice and bend them that way before you attach them, 2mm is no match for a hammer. You can bend them with a pliers once there in also but dosen't work as well

Thanks for the advice, they were easier to bend than I expected.
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Postby MitchB on Tue Aug 04, 2009 5:10 pm

Thanks Chris! Really well done! Logical, Simple, Informative!

Some questions/requests regarding this bit:

"The only attachment point on the mast is a single saddle on the leading edge. All control line blocks attach to this saddle with short rope strops. No fancy brackets to eventually fall off, nor extra holes to weaken the mast!"

What do you use for the rope strops?
Could you provide a photo of the leading edge of the mast and perhaps a close up of the "spider web" at the trailing edge?

Mitch

PS I'll just have a look one Saturday, but it was the only part of the guide a found unclear!
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Postby CDance on Tue Aug 04, 2009 9:13 pm

MitchB wrote:....


What do you use for the rope strops?
Could you provide a photo of the leading edge of the mast and perhaps a close up of the "spider web" at the trailing edge?

Mitch

PS I'll just have a look one Saturday, but it was the only part of the guide a found unclear!


Hi Mitch,

Thanks for the feedback. You're correct. This is a complex "spider web"! I've added a bit more of a text description and will take another photo this weekend and update the article.

If anyone else wants to request any more angles/perspectives, let me know.

Cheers,

Chris
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Postby CDance on Tue Aug 11, 2009 1:53 pm

MitchB wrote:....
Could you provide a photo of the leading edge of the mast and perhaps a close up of the "spider web" at the trailing edge?


Hi Mitch,

Extra photo added as requested.

Cheers,

Chris
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Postby CDance on Wed Sep 02, 2009 11:46 pm

I've added a photo of an alternate vang attachment method - using a rope strop. See the bottom of the guide under "Alternate Ideas".

If anyone else has any alternatives they thing should be included in the guide, please send through a photo and description and I'll add.

Cheers

Chris

email: chris <.a.> papercut.com
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Postby DavidG on Mon Mar 01, 2010 10:01 pm

You mention that the towel rail should be bolted to the boom. From the photo it looks like the bolts come through from inside the boom, and each nut is screwed on from the outside. This might be a silly question, but how do you get each bolt through the hole from inside the boom, especially the forward one? And how do you secure the bolt heads while screwing on the nut?
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bolted towel rails

Postby Phillip Johnson on Thu Mar 04, 2010 8:01 pm

The way I do is to use ring spanner with a piece of masking tape to hold the nut in place while the spanner is inserted into the boom. I extend the spanner using small piece of wood taped to the spnnner. The bolt is inserted through the fiitting and boom to the nut inside the boom. If you want insert the bolt from the inside the boom use a stainless steel machine screw because it has a hexagonal head which is easier to use with a ring spanner. A bit of patience is a good assistant.

Phillip Johnson
National Measurer
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Postby andrewb on Fri Mar 05, 2010 9:17 am

Another way to to get the fitting bolted on is to use a bolt longer than required, but less than the ID of the boom. From step 3 below you will be able to figure out how much additional length is required, depending on the pliers/grips you have available.

1.Stick the head of the bolt onto anything long enough to reach far enough into the boom. BluTac or plasticine will do the job nicely. The bolt should be at right angles to the support your are using.

2. Feed the bolt down the inside of the boom & push it through the hole. Grab the end of it & feed it through the hole in the towel rail.

3. Hold onto the bolt with pliers so there is a long enough length to thread the nut onto until the end of the bolt protrudes through the nut. Make sure you don't grip the thread so tight that you crush the thread.

4. Now grip the end of the bolt (vice grips are good & it doesn't matter if you crush the thread now) & tighten the nut down on to the towel rail.

5. Cut of the protruding end of the bolt once tightened. Remember to use nyloc nuts or two nuts & lock them together.

If you use nyloc you will have to be careful at step 3 that you don't damage the thread as you will need a fairly firm grip on the bolt.

If you need to use this method for more inaccessible fittings inside spars or buoyancy tanks the rigid support in step 1 & 2 can be replaced by whipping twine, threaded through the hole & attached to the thread of the bolt using heatshrink or pvc tape. The hole will need to be a bit oversize to allow this to pass through - check it all fits befroe pulling the bolt through.

Andrew.
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Postby Slow Hand on Fri Mar 05, 2010 2:28 pm

Hi guys,
I'm blonde.
I would drill a hole on the opposite side of the boom - big enough for the screw driver to fit thru. There's no real breaking pressure in that area of the boom.
PLUS - if there is damage - or subsequent loosening of the fitting - it is EASY to fix in a hurry - which is when things break isn't it.
The underside hole can also be used for securing jocket strap ends when trailing :-)
Sue
1724 nui uma
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Postby DavidG on Mon Mar 15, 2010 10:36 pm

Many thanks to all of you. Armed with those ideas I'm sure towel rail and boom will become inseparable!
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Postby CDance on Mon Jan 17, 2011 10:52 pm

Hi All,

I've had a few emails (including one from the USA!) asking me for my mast step and rake measurements as used in the Nationals. I've taken the opportunity to update my rigging guide based. You can view this here:

http://bit.ly/eUgkbh

Changes:

* Mast step and rake measurements
* Centerboard rake
* New options for toe straps and foil bags
* Photo of main halyard retainer
* Details of the cut of Irwin sail used.


As always, if anyone needs any extra photos or measurements, please just ask.

Thanks to those that have offered suggestions and submitted ideas and photos.

Cheers,

Chris

Espresso
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Last edited by CDance on Fri Jan 21, 2011 10:45 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Postby ronny_f73 on Tue Jan 18, 2011 8:32 pm

Thanks Chris a big help!
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